You Are Not Alone

After the unexpected death of his wife, Irish author C.S. Lewis wrote in A Grief Observed, "No one ever told me that grief felt so like fear. The death of a beloved is an amputation."

While dealing with grief is not easy, we believe the resources within this section of our website can help. Should you need additional support in grieving your loss, please see these helpful links provided. We will do everything we can to assist you.

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WHAT IS GRIEF?

 

Grief is a natural response to loss. It's the emotional suffering you feel when something or someone you love is taken away. Often, the pain of loss can feel overwhelming. You may experience all kinds of difficult and unexpected emotions, from shock or anger to disbelief, guilt, and profound sadness. You are never prepared when grief comes. There is an overwhelming amount of thoughts, feelings, anxiety and the heartbreak can be crushing.

However, you can overcome this! Choose to let your inner strength harness power for self-growth. 

Amazing progess will happen and sometimes great things will come from pain.

 
THE GRIEVING PROCESS

J. W. Worden identifies four tasks in grieving: accept the loss, acknowledge the pain of the loss, adjust to a new environment and reinvest in the reality of a new life. The tasks of grief are not states of achievement but a fluctuating process to accommodate a new normal lifestyle without what was lost.

For Sigmund Freud, 'grief work' involved a process of breaking the ties that bound the survivor to the deceased. This psychic rearrangement involved three elements: (1) freeing the bereaved from bondage to the deceased; (2) readjustment to new life circumstances without the deceased; and (3) building of new relationships.

Sigmund Freud first brought up the concept of grief work in 1917, and today the idea that bereavement is purpose-driven continues.

HELPING YOURSELF HEAL

 

ACCEPTANCE IS THE 5TH STAGE OF GRIEF

 

Acceptance can usually be seen by an individual taking ownership for themselves and their actions. These individuals begin to accept responsibility. They work toward accomplishing tasks and then are proud of the results. They are willing to change their behavior in response to the needs of others.

ACCEPTING A LOSS

 

WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO ACCEPT A LOSS?

Acceptance means embracing the present – both good and bad – in order to shape the future. It does not mean that we no longer can think about the loved one. Out of sight does not have to mean out of mind. Our current “present” has been gloriously touched by the loved one's life. Reflect upon those good times.

We Are Here For You

 

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